I'm a guy with multiple interests. This is where I document my projects.

dungeonsanddrawing:

Some sketches from our current D&D campaign. A dwarf paladin, a dragon about to get rammed by a ship and an Azer (fire dwarf, basically) arm-wrestling a fire elemental.

Our campaign is pretty fun. 

3 weeks ago on March 30th, 2014 at 9:46 pm | Permalink | Reblog from

helpfulharrie:

Source: FOERVRAENGD

List of tutorials that helped me with environmental painting:
"How to make your own Perspective Grid in PS" <—- this one is the best thing I’ve ever discovered. Srsly CHECK IT OOOOUUUUT!
Snuffen’s Background Tutorial P1More or less ALL tutorials by Griffsnuff is awesome, so make sure to check out the rest of them!
More or less ALL tutorials made by AquaSixio!

List of youtube channels that also helped and inspired me:

FZDSCHOOL - More or less one of the most known concept art-related resources I know on youtube. It’s great to sit and draw and just listen to the talking.

SinixDesign- This guy is also great! He has some design workshops ever now and then where the viewers can send in their stuff for critique! very encouraging and inspiring!

moatddtutorials- This guy is more into drawing than painting, and has a more cartoony style. He has interesting methods when it comes to perspective. And he also challenge himself in some of his videos (the engine block video is a great example of this)

foxOrian- Also known here on dA for his awesome perspective and composition tutorials. He has a youtube channel where he posts some videos that might be interesting as well.

4 months ago on November 28th, 2013 at 10:50 pm | Permalink | Reblog from

This was first posted at my webcomic, cakeburger.com. Check it out. 

This is a press release in the form of a comic I did for my friend Lee. Who wrote an entire music notation programwith his voice and feet, while in agony. I still have trouble believing it. But it really is true.

Background: A few months ago, Lee asked if I could edit a press release he was planning on sending round for the release of the premium (paid) version of his free music notation program. He’s a friend of the family – my brother designed the Musink icon and website. I said sure.  I didn’t need to edit much – the press release was already pretty much fine, but I wondered if we could do it in a way that would really get the attention Lee’s story (and his software) deserve. So, seeing as my comic book CV had got a bit of attention back when I first sent it out, I thought I’d try doing his story as a comic.

Anyway, if you’re a musician, I strongly recommend you check out Musink. If you’re not – please help Lee by sharing this comic far and wide. Lee went through hell and still managed to code a massive program. With his feet. The fact that it’s a bloody decent program is a side benefit, as is the fact that Lee is a bloody decent guy. I’m proud to call him a friend, and I hope I can help him out by doing whatever I can towards seeing his app get the attention it deserves.

4 months ago on November 24th, 2013 at 11:44 pm | Permalink

Gots some new digs

Hey followers! I am going to be tumbling at cakeburger.tumblr.com from now on so go ahead and follow me over there.

4 months ago on November 24th, 2013 at 10:18 pm | Permalink
richardfairgray:

Bertolt Brecht’s Pencil

I like this. 
9 months ago on July 1st, 2013 at 10:22 pm | Permalink | Reblog from
nctryzob:

Moebius

nctryzob:

Moebius

10 months ago on June 17th, 2013 at 9:55 pm | Permalink | Reblog from

I want to live in all these houses.

(Source: teanoot)

10 months ago on June 12th, 2013 at 7:40 pm | Permalink | Reblog from
caseyroonan:

“Darwin’s Finches,” digital (ink on bristol), 12 1/2” x 12 1/2,” 2012.
An assignment for a science illustration class. We were supposed to come up with a new, more effective way to portray the process of evolution than the common image of man “ascending” from ape. I decided to build on this sequential element rather than completely abandon it - creating a series of linear progressions that branch off in many directions from one common ancestor.
I also thought it would be helpful to move away from the loaded (and frankly tired) imagery of Man’s evolution, and instead work in a smaller time frame and from a humbler place in the animal kingdom… Taking Darwin’s own drawings of Galapagos Island “finches” as direct inspiration.
My drawings are not entirely accurate to actual species of course, but my hope is that the ideas driving the images more eloquently express some of the misunderstood aspects of evolutionary theory. Namely, the idea of constant mutation and variation - as opposed to the single chain of “progress” that the more common, hierarchical images suggest - and of a shared ancestry.
-CR 

caseyroonan:

Darwin’s Finches,” digital (ink on bristol), 12 1/2” x 12 1/2,” 2012.

An assignment for a science illustration class. We were supposed to come up with a new, more effective way to portray the process of evolution than the common image of man “ascending” from ape. I decided to build on this sequential element rather than completely abandon it - creating a series of linear progressions that branch off in many directions from one common ancestor.

I also thought it would be helpful to move away from the loaded (and frankly tired) imagery of Man’s evolution, and instead work in a smaller time frame and from a humbler place in the animal kingdom… Taking Darwin’s own drawings of Galapagos Island “finches” as direct inspiration.

My drawings are not entirely accurate to actual species of course, but my hope is that the ideas driving the images more eloquently express some of the misunderstood aspects of evolutionary theory. Namely, the idea of constant mutation and variation - as opposed to the single chain of “progress” that the more common, hierarchical images suggest - and of a shared ancestry.

-CR 

1 year ago on October 2nd, 2012 at 5:14 pm | Permalink | Reblog from
dresdencodak:

People can be oversensitive, sure, and I think a lot of social justice/outrage on the internet is completely overblown and mostly the product of very young people forming an identity around being offended or being offended on behalf of other people. Self-righteousness of this kind is a lazy kind of behavior done in the place of being legitimately socially conscious. Reblogging or retweeting something someone said and repeatedly calling them a bigot is not the same thing as actually raising public awareness about an issue or (ideally) working to solve it.
On the other hand, that doesn’t in any way mean there isn’t a massive amount of horrible, hurtful things being said by people everywhere, and that there isn’t a huge amount of the public mindset that has some screwed up ideas of how to treat people. Every thoughtful human being has a moral obligation to combat bigotry and all forms of intolerance, but the way you combat bigotry is extremely important. Doing it incorrectly or for the wrong reasons can make matters worse.
How do you strike the balance? Here’s my rule of thumb: Before saying something, ask yourself: am I doing this to realistically change the mind of this person or others’, or am I doing this to show how much more progressive I am? Nothing’s more venomous than attacking someone simply to assert your place in a subculture, even if it’s a subculture of activism. It’s important to always think pragmatically: if what you’re about to say/type/do seems like it’s more about making your feel better, you should rethink how you’re doing it. Lashing out or even mildly nitpicking can potentially hurt what you’re actually trying to accomplish.
The purpose of calling out hurtful language, etc is to ultimately change human behavior for the better. Anything you do without that goal in mind has the potential to be toxic. Don’t release more hate into the world, it’s the opposite of what you set out to do.

This is truth.

dresdencodak:

People can be oversensitive, sure, and I think a lot of social justice/outrage on the internet is completely overblown and mostly the product of very young people forming an identity around being offended or being offended on behalf of other people. Self-righteousness of this kind is a lazy kind of behavior done in the place of being legitimately socially conscious. Reblogging or retweeting something someone said and repeatedly calling them a bigot is not the same thing as actually raising public awareness about an issue or (ideally) working to solve it.

On the other hand, that doesn’t in any way mean there isn’t a massive amount of horrible, hurtful things being said by people everywhere, and that there isn’t a huge amount of the public mindset that has some screwed up ideas of how to treat people. Every thoughtful human being has a moral obligation to combat bigotry and all forms of intolerance, but the way you combat bigotry is extremely important. Doing it incorrectly or for the wrong reasons can make matters worse.

How do you strike the balance? Here’s my rule of thumb: Before saying something, ask yourself: am I doing this to realistically change the mind of this person or others’, or am I doing this to show how much more progressive I am? Nothing’s more venomous than attacking someone simply to assert your place in a subculture, even if it’s a subculture of activism. It’s important to always think pragmatically: if what you’re about to say/type/do seems like it’s more about making your feel better, you should rethink how you’re doing it. Lashing out or even mildly nitpicking can potentially hurt what you’re actually trying to accomplish.

The purpose of calling out hurtful language, etc is to ultimately change human behavior for the better. Anything you do without that goal in mind has the potential to be toxic. Don’t release more hate into the world, it’s the opposite of what you set out to do.

This is truth.

1 year ago on August 26th, 2012 at 11:27 pm | Permalink | Reblog from